komanidai:

maybe we all stopped using XD because we stopped being capable of that kind of happiness 

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After four years of being an art student and graduating as one, I feel like I’ve really developed a greater understanding of it than I ever have. And moreso, developed a desire to see more, and way beyond what is purely optical. It took me years to understand the way the artworld works, and how art is perceived in terms of what is acceptable as contemporary, and why solid blue canvasses can be sold for 60 mil. 

A recent Old Navy ad came out with Amy Poehler as an art critic and I think it’s very funny because it does point out the stereotypes most people have of what high art is: bullshit, highfalutin, eccentric… overpriced… meaningless.. .etc. All of that. I agree that some of those stereotypes are very true. Many artists are full of shit, but I honestly believe that most of them create art with such integrity and so intentionally that the stereotype is really just the perception of people who don’t comprehend what it really means to create art. 

For example, a few years ago, I hated contemporary art, all of it. I thought it was full of shit. I hated Oldenberg and his boring sculptures. I hated Warhol and all of pop art. Rothko, Mondrian, Pollock, I can literally do everything they can.

But as I continued to learn about art history and read into the rise of contemporary art, it all clicked to me. Yeah, Jackson Pollock literally threw paint onto a piece of canvas that he put on the ground and flicked cigarette butts into, but before Jackson Pollock was popular, all you could really paint and be noticed for in America were like, these western scenes, and portraits. The scope for what was acceptable was so incredibly small. And that is the whole point of every movement in art history— to change what was stagnant, to widen the scope, to question the institution, and to create work that had depth beyond what you can just see and what was previously acceptable. Pollock sort of put America in the art scene. He blew that shit up, yo. Of course, it was somewhat of a coincidence after Europe and the war and not to mention the media fluff, his persona of the emotional cowboy… etc. But that all comes into play.

The end result is when someone buys a Pollock painting for 140 mil (actual price), they’re not just buying a giant rag with house paint all over, they’re buying a piece of Art History. They’re buying one of the moments that lead to “oh shit… we don’t have to paint just people any more” and “oh shit.. I see you, America, putting your foot in the art game.” 

And yes, your kid can make what Jackson Pollock made. But let me tell you, if he hadn’t made that first and opened the door a little more, the possibility of art even being anything beyond portraiture or iconographic image wouldn’t even be there. And then no, you could never say your kid can make that.

Most artists understand this. Most know the formal elements, history, technique, and understand the rules of having ‘no rules’. So when they paint a vase of sunflowers that’s already been done and popularized, they know they have to make it really interesting.

Anyway. Yeah, so to me, the contemporary section is now an enjoyable place to walk through because I love looking at work and thinking, “what does this reference”, “what does this mean”, and most importantly I am able to see the changes that are happening to the field. Granted, in most museums, the contemporary section is a few years old and the institution has already kind of fucked with it, but it’s a decent place to start.

So, when people tell me that getting a studio art degree is a waste of time, I laugh. In no universe did I get my degree for someone else. I love art. I love the act of creating something meaningful and personal, I love the potential, and I love the history. It’s okay if you don’t understand that, but it’s kind of like hearing a language you don’t speak: just because you don’t comprehend the conversation doesn’t mean it’s invalid. Appreciate what you can- the sound, the rhythm, but don’t dismiss it for nonsense because it’s not something you own.

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"Maybe my limbs are made
mostly for decoration,
like the way I feel about
persimmons. You can’t
really eat them. Or you
wouldn’t want to. If you grab
the soft skin with your fist
it somehow feels funny,
like you’ve been here
before and uncomfortable,
too, like you’d rather
squish it between your teeth
impatiently, before spitting
the soft parts back up
to linger on the tongue like
burnt sugar or guilt.
For starters, it was all
an accident, you cut
the right branch
and a sort of light
woke up underneath,
and the inedible fruit
grew dark and needy.
Think crucial hanging.
Think crayon orange.
There is one low, leaning
heart-shaped globe left
and dearest, can you
tell, I am trying
to love you less."
-"Crush," Ada Limón  (via commovente)
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asylum-art:

Agnes Toth's Fragmented Paintings

Saatchi Art, Facebook

You might notice that English painter Agnes Toth’s work looks incomplete. Although logic entices us to notice the missing links, Toth’s techinque aspires to find the threshold between abstract and figurative painting. Her colorful, intentionally half-finished, realistic paintings are the result.

Toth began to create these incomplete paintings in 2008. This method gave her a sense of freedom — the possibility to not feel obligated to fill in the canvas from one corner to the other. The incompleteness of her work also derives from her life philosophy, one that aims towards working and living at a slower pace. “This is what I aim to achieve with my paintings,” she says, “to get back to that harmony and contemplation, to celebrate beauty and serenity.” For Toth, one of the purposes of painting is a meditation exercise, one that requires full concentration on her creative intentions.

In a sense, her pieces provide the viewer with the possibility to become more contemplative. In trying to take everything in, we get lost in the various colorful, fragmented pieces in the hope of somehow putting it all back together. 

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asylum-art:

Eric Standley: 3D Laser Cut Paper Art, "stained glass"

Eric Standley is an artist and educator currently living and working in Virginia. In his incredible series of 3D laser cut paper art, Standley’s work is found at the intersection of art, technology, history and mathematics.

His vector drawings were initially inspired by the geometry in Gothic and Islamic architectural ornamentation. The pieces are painstakingly assembled from laser-cut paper, layered to create elaborate 3-D works of art. Often these works are created using well over 100 layers of paper and can take months of planning and drawing. The result is so intricately detailed that the pieces must be viewed from multiple perspectives to be fully appreciated.

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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Mit Senoj

1. Miss Asilidae

2. Frog

2014

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oxblood:

The problem with writers is that we find sentimentality in the most mundane of places. Moving out of the apartment that witnessed the unfurling of my first real romance feels surreal and more than mildly upsetting.

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sensei-aishitemasu:

Tear gas is banned in international warfare — and in use in Ferguson, MO
http://www.vox.com/2014/8/14/6001995/ferguson-missouri-tear-gas-painful
In case anyone didn’t know, the use of tear gas was banned in international warfare at the Geneva Convention. These are human rights violations, people. Ferguson PD needs to be put in front of a UN board as war criminals. They are also arresting and detaining journalists.
Stay woke.

sensei-aishitemasu:

Tear gas is banned in international warfare — and in use in Ferguson, MO

http://www.vox.com/2014/8/14/6001995/ferguson-missouri-tear-gas-painful

In case anyone didn’t know, the use of tear gas was banned in international warfare at the Geneva Convention. These are human rights violations, people. Ferguson PD needs to be put in front of a UN board as war criminals. They are also arresting and detaining journalists.

Stay woke.

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